Category: Arts & Entertainment

Sudbury arts and entertainment in brief

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Sudbury Burlesque takes audiences back to the cabaret

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Sudbury Burlesque, Northern Ontario’s premier burlesque troupe, is getting ready to celebrate love and nostalgia with their latest production. From Feb. 9-17, Sudbury Burlesque presents Va-Va-Valentine: A Burlesque cabaret at Steve’s Encore Lounge in the Sudbury Theatre Centre, 170 Shaughnessy St.

This latest production features a sizzling revue with Sudbury Burlesque’s cast of showgirls, accompanied by a live trio of local jazz musicians.

With champagne, hors-d’oeuvres, go-go dancing, sweet treats, party favours and local vendors, the event promises to tantalize and provoke from the moment the doors open to the minute patrons leave.

“We’re going all the way back to our roots with this production,” said Jess Crowe, the troupe’s artistic director. “We started over 10 years ago with smaller, more intimate productions and we’re very excited to get back to performances where we get to connect with each and every audience member.”

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The soundtrack to this Valentine’s Day spectacle will have that swing that harkens to the era of jazz greats and the STC lounge will be transformed to feel just like the cabarets that gave life to those classics.

Shows start at 7:30 p.m. Doors open at 7 p.m. A cash bar will be available. Sudbury Burlesque shows are for audiences 19 years of age and older.

Electronic tickets are available

Jan. 26-29 Entertainment Report: Lively arts, music, shows in and around Manchester

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This week’s round-up of live entertainment in and around Manchester is brought to you by A. Robert Dionne of Ted Herbert Music School & Rentals. Email your entertainment events to [email protected] for consideration. Be sure to add your events to the InkLink community calendar for possible inclusion in the live radio report on WMNH 95.3 (The Morning Show with Peter White – “World of Entertainment” LIVE every Thursday at 8 a.m.)


Featured LIVE MUSIC:

Catch Sugah Rush at The Goat Jan. 26.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 26th    

  • Chris Lester / The Foundry (Manchester) / 5pm
  • Clint Lapointe / Homestead (Merrimack) / 5:30pm
  • Jordan Quinn / Fratello’s (Manchester) / 5:30pm
  • Lewis Goodwin / Elm House of Pizza (Manchester) / 6pm
  • Brad Myrick / San Francisco Kitchen (Nashua) / 6:30pm
  • John Chouinard / City Hall Pub (Manchester) / 7pm
  • Mugsy Trio / Stumble Inn (Londonderry) / 7pm
  • Ralph Allen / Tortilla Flat (Merrimack) / 7pm
  • Peter Higgins / Strange Brew Tavern (Manchester) / 8pm
  • Sugah Rush / The Goat (Manchester) / 9pm

Emily’s Rock Band will rock the Derryfield Jan. 27.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 27th     

  • Mikey G. / Backyard Brewery (Manchester) / 6pm
  • Dave Clark / Homestead (Merrimack) / 6pm
  • Clint Lapointe / Coach Stop (Londonderry) / 6pm
  • Rebecca Turmel / The Foundry (Manchester) / 6pm
  • Jud Caswell / Over The Farmstead (Pittsfield) / 6pm
  • Kimayo / San Francisco Kitchen (Nashua) / 6:30pm
  • Sam Hammerman / Luna Bistro (Salem) / 7pm
  • Emily’s Garage Band / Derryfield (Manchester) / 8pm
  • Something Else Band / Stumble Inn (Londonderry) / 8pm
  • The Drift Duo / Telly’s (Epping) / 8pm
  • 7 Day Weekend / The Goat (Manchester) / 9pm
  • Martin Kelly / Bonfire Country Bar (Manchester) / 9pm

Ariel Strasser performs Jan. 28 at The Hill Bar & Grill.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 28th   

  • Dave Clark / The

Sudbury listings, Jan. 28 to Jan. 31

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Jan. 28

A selection committee for the YWCA in Sudbury has chosen its Women of Distinction for 2022. Seven remarkable women will be awarded the honour this year — Adebola Adefioye, Adekelu Ogunleye, Jackie Balleny, Jennifer Hawkins, Kyelle Byne, Paula Coulson and Sonia Peczeniuk. The 2022 Women of Distinction awards gala will be held in person on Jan. 28 at the United Steelworkers Hall. One of last year’s impressive Women of Distinction, Renee Fuchs, will be the master of ceremonies. Funds raised go to YWCA Sudbury’s youth programming, specifically the Power of Being a Girl and Boys for Real conferences.

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Acting workshop: For those interested in stage acting, the Sudbury Performance Group is offering an acting workshop with Brenda Kimono on Jan. 26-29. Go to sudburyperformancegroup.ca for details about the workshop.

Walk: Join the Coalition for a Liveable Sudbury and Rainbow Routes Association for a winter nature walk through the Laurentian University green space. The walk will take place on Jan. 28 at 1:30 p.m. Meet at the trail sign at the south end of the parking lot at the LU athletic building. The walk will be co-led by Gerard Courtin, and naturalist and biologist Franco Mariotti. Peter Beckett will assist. Register at liveablesudbury.org/c4c.

Art: The Art Gallery of Sudbury, 251 John St., invites you to

Omaha Entertainment and Arts Awards move to Bluffs venue

The red carpet will be out at the Hoff Family Arts & Culture Center in Council Bluffs on Sunday for the Omaha Entertainment and Arts Awards.

The ceremony is returning to an in-person event this year for the first time since 2020. Awards will be presented to local visual artists, musicians and performers in a number of categories.

Lifetime achievement awards will go to painter, paper artist and installation artist Susan Knight, R&B drummer and musician Curly Martin and actor Cork Ramer. BFF (Benson First Friday) Omaha and its founder, Alex Jochim, will receive a cultural stewardship award.

Poet and performer Zedeka Poindexter and actor and producer Kerron Stark will be the hosts.

The evening will begin when McCormick’s 1894 bar opens at 5 p.m. for pre-ceremony drinks and food from Chef Around the Block. Guests also can browse through the Anne & John P. Nelson Gallery at that time.

People are also reading…

The ceremony begins at 6:30 and will feature several live performances.

Tickets are $20 for general admission and $25 for reserved seats. They’re available at paceartsiowa.org or 712-890-5601. Food and drink is extra.

The Hoff Family Arts & Culture Center is at 1001 S. Sixth St. in Council Bluffs.

Lunar New Year’s Gala

Traditional Chinese instrument musicians and Yue Opera performers from Los Angeles will be onstage Saturday night at the Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St., for a Lunar New Year’s Gala.

The Nebraska Chinese Association is sponsoring the event to celebrate the Year of the Rabbit. They promise a dazzling program highlighting Asian culture and history through pageantry, stunning costumes, exciting dances and beautiful music.

Tickets for the 7 p.m. program range from $30 to $60 and are available at ticketomaha.com or 402-345-0606.

Music of John Williams

Composer John Williams was nominated for an

Pinellas Arts & Entertainment: Signal Box Art, Out Of Eden Exhibit

LARGO, FL — Creative Pinellas and Pinellas County are joining together to create the 2023 ARTWorks Signal Box Project that encourages artists to submit original artwork to beautify Pinellas County by transforming the traffic signal control boxes into a collection of public art.

The purpose of traffic signal cabinet art is to deter graffiti vandalism on transportation infrastructure, beautify the rights of way and community, and support Pinellas County as an arts destination. The use of art on public infrastructure has been shown to prevent graffiti vandalism in the county, demonstrating that “Public Art Works.”

The Signal Box project will have two rounds of Call to Artists in 2023 with nins locations identified throughout Pinellas County. The first Call to Artists launched Jan. 20, and the first three Pinellas County rtists will be selected through a process that reviews their portfolio of work submitted, written design concepts and their history as a working artist in Pinellas County. The second Call to Artists will open in the spring and will seek six Pinellas County artists.

Find out what’s happening in Dunedinwith free, real-time updates from Patch.

This program is open to all Pinellas County-based professional visual artists, graphic designers, illustrators and photographers. Artwork may be abstract or representational.

“We are excited about this partnership with Pinellas County and the opportunity to create more work for local artists while beautifying these traffic signal cabinets in our community which is proven to deter graffiti vandalism,” said Creative Pinellas CEO Barbara St. Clair. “This ARTworks Signal Box Project adds even more to the great work already being done with signal boxes in Pinellas County and further enhances the Arts Coast experience.”

Find out what’s happening in Dunedinwith free, real-time updates from Patch.

Pinellas County and Creative Pinellas have worked together to select

Atlanta’s 500 Most Powerful Leaders in 2023: Arts, Sports, & Entertainment

2023 Atlanta 500: Arts, Sports, & Entertainment
High Museum of Art

Photograph by Shutterstock

Arts | Film, Music, & Entertainment | Sports | Legends

ARTS

Atlanta 500: Susan Bridges

Photograph courtesy of Susan Bridges

Susan Bridges
Owner and Director
Whitespace Gallery

For 15 years, Atlanta native Susan Bridges curated pop-up shows around the city in churches, U-Haul facilities, shipping containers, and an underground parking garage. In 2006, she opened Whitespace Gallery in a former carriage house behind her Victorian home in Inman Park. Today, the gallery represents more than 40 local and national artists, who’ve shown work at the Smithsonian Institution, the Venice Biennale, and Art Basel Miami Beach.

Education: University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
First job: Receptionist, ad agency
What I’d tell my 18-year-old self: Everything’s going to be okay.
Few people know: I love to dance.
Favorite Atlanta place to visit: My garden


Atlanta 500 Yehimi Cambrón Álvarez

Yehimi Cambrón Álvarez
Artist, Activist, and Public Speaker

Yehimi Cambrón is an artist, activist, and public speaker born in Michoacán, Mexico, and raised in Atlanta whose work focuses on celebrating the humanity, resilience, and contributions of immigrants. Cambrón’s series Family Portrait was displayed at the High Museum in 2019 and the Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia in 2020. In June 2020 she completed her tallest mural to date, We Give Each Other the World, a community-responsive piece cofunded by the National Endowment for the Arts and the City of Hapeville. In August 2020, Cambrón completed Monuments: Atlanta’s Immigrants, a mural at the Home Depot Backyard at Mercedes-Benz Stadium. Cambrón’s work centers on immigrants and predominantly reflects the experiences of undocumented Americans.

Education: Agnes Scott College
Notable achievements: Atlanta Business Chronicle 40 Under 40 (2020), Georgia Hispanic Chamber of Commerce 50 Most Influential Latinos in Georgia (2018-2020)
Why I chose this work: I am an artist because I don’t know how else to exist.

Arts and Entertainment Page 2022 Year in Review 2/2 |  bloginfo(‘name’); ?>


January 27, 2023   ·  
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By Constance Scrafield

Happy New Year to you and the widespread, marvellous arts community in this whole region. What follows is our review for the many shows, events and accolades over 2022. This is part two of the 2022 Arts Review. Part one ran on Page A13 last week.

January through December: HA – staged nine art shows featuring a wide variety of visual artists using many mediums and themes.

2022: A dazzling list of awards to sumi-é artist, Roslyn Levin, who has a mini studio at Dragonfly: From Sumi-é Artists of Canada, the Ruth Yamada Award; the Modern Ink Painting Art Award from the International Chinese Calligraphy Ink Painting Society (ICCPS), adjudicated in Japan; from the Sumi-e Society of America, the Shozo and Alice Soto Award for Best All-Ink Sumi-e Painting. 

May and every month for the year: Dragonfly Arts on Broadway – there was a good showing in the Dragonfly windows, changing monthly, by artists Tanya Zaryski, Jack Zhou, John Adams and Kathryn Thomson and others. Two new jewellers were added to the fold inside: Emily Kowalik from Dufferin and Tony de Luca from Fergus.

May 15: Achill Choral Society (ACS), having worked together on their music over Zoom during January to March, then in person thereafter, offering video streaming to members at home, ACS was ready to perform a spring concert at the Avalon Retirement Centre.

May 21 – 22: AMAC- Arts in the Annex – a market place for a weekend of artists displaying their fine work in the Annex under the tent for the first time. Very well received by patrons.

Summer: Headwaters Arts (HA), based at the Alton Mill Arts Centre, spent the pandemic applying and receiving grants from Ontario Trillium Foundation (Resilient Communities Fund and Community Building

‘The funky vibe of Telluride’ | Arts & Entertainment

It sells out in no time flat, organizers rarely need to beg for acts, and the onstage outrageousness is the stuff of legend. Everything imaginable, and unimaginable, has gone down on the historic Sheridan Opera House stage for Lip Sync, from inadvertent nudity to cardboard jalopies, with costumes ranging from fishnets to furries. And the songs? Springsteen, the Roches, Kill the Wabbit, chanting monks, original rap songs, Dusty Springfield, metal, country, dance and spoken word. In a word, anything. What is it about the annual KOTO Lip Sync Contest — happening Friday at 8 p.m. at the Sheridan Opera House — that makes it one of Telluride’s most anticipated events of the year? What is the secret to its enduring popularity?

Bärbel Hacke has produced the event for the nonprofit community radio station for three years and has taken the stage in award-winning acts since 1986. She remarked that the free-wheeling, unpredictable show possesses the ability to bring people together.

“The arts bring us together,” she said. “It brings together the community across all ages and ways of life, and also our new people. So, they’re getting the vibe. The funky vibe of Telluride.”

For the uninitiated, Lip Sync performers put together acts that vie for the top three donated cash prizes. Through the years, there have been acts ranging from the simple — a solo balladeer, perhaps — to those involving numerous people and props. The idea is to choose a song, stage it creatively and, most importantly, nail the tune in a way that makes the judges think you are actually singing the song. Lip. Sync.

Not only are the acts judged on knowing the lyrics well and miming them succinctly, but aspects such as choreography, creativity and audience reaction are tabulated into the judges’ scores. When it’s

Arts And Entertainment: Stageworks Donation, HeART Of Ybor Winners

TAMPA, FL — Stageworks Theatre, Tampa’s longest-running professional theater company, begins 2023 with two newly announced gifts totaling more than $2 million, providing a strong foundation to secure the theater’s long-term future.

Mercury Advisors, the developers of Grand Central at Kennedy, gifted Stageworks its current 99-seat, first-floor theater at 1120 E Kennedy Blvd., Suite 151. The gift is valued at $2.45 million.

Additionally, the Tampa-based Frank E. Duckwall Foundation Inc. provided a $10,000 grant for the theater company to convert to more energy-efficient stage lighting.

Find out what’s happening in Tampawith free, real-time updates from Patch.

The gifts come as Stageworks celebrates its 40th anniversary season. The milestone will be marked during the theater company’s annual gala on Feb. 4.

“We are extremely grateful for these amazing gifts,” said Karla Hartley, Stageworks’ producing artistic director. “They signify the confidence these organizations have not only in our outstanding performances but in Stageworks’ vision for the future. As we continue to expand our fundraising efforts, these donations will help ensure that Stageworks continues to inspire and educate Tampa audiences and produce groundbreaking new works for many years to come.”

Find out what’s happening in Tampawith free, real-time updates from Patch.

Late last year, Mercury Advisors decided to sell its first-floor retail holdings, but chose not to include the theater to ensure Stageworks continued to have a performance space. Stageworks has leased the theater from Mercury Advisors since 2012.

“Mercury Advisors have been steadfast supporters for the past 10 years and we cannot thank them enough for their generosity in offering and facilitating this transaction,” said Hartley.

“Owning our theater will help us fulfill our potential, especially after the challenges of the pandemic, which impacted arts organizations around the world,” said Jennifer Scher, chairwoman of Stageworks Theatre’s board of directors.

Gerald Carpenter: CAMA Concert Spans Century of Romantic Imaginings | Arts & Entertainment

Since at least the late 1950s, any list of the five greatest orchestras in the United States has included the Chicago Symphony.

Riccardo Muti conducts Chicago Symphony.
Riccardo Muti conducts Chicago Symphony. Credit: Courtesy photo

The list of its past music directors includes many of the greatest names in Twentieth Century music, such as Rafael Kubelík (1950-53), Fritz Reiner (1953-62), Sir Georg Solti (1969-91), Daniel Barenboim (1991-2006), and Bernard Haitink (2006-10).

The list of principal guest conductors, much shorter, includes the peerless musicians Carlo Maria Giulini (1969-72), Claudio Abbado (1982-85), and Pierre Boulez (1995–2006).

All in all, no orchestra in America can boast the equal of this roster. The Chicago Symphony’s current music director, Riccardo Muti (2010-present), is in every sense worthy of this heritage.

Now, the Community Arts-Music Association (CAMA) will host a concert by this great orchestra, conducted by Muti, at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 25 in the Granada Theater.

The program is comprised of Ludwig Beethoven’s “‘Coriolan’ Overture, Opus 62” (1807) and his “Symphony No. 8 in F-Major, Opus 93” (1812-14); Anatoly Lyadov’s tone poem, “The Enchanted Lake, Opus 62” (1909); and Modest Mussorgsky’s “Pictures at an Exhibition” (1874; orchestrated by Maurice Ravel, 1923).

The x-factor here, if there is one, is Anatoly Lyadov (1855-1914), who is certainly not here to disturb the peace. He came from a family of highly placed professional musicians, dancers, and singers.

His paternal grandfather, Nikolai G. Lyadov, was conductor of the Petersburg Philharmonic Society; his father, Konstantin Lyadov, was chief conductor of the Imperial Opera Company; his mother, Vera Antipova, was a pianist; sister, Valentina, a dramatic actress, was first married to a famous opera singer, and then to a musician.

The influence of Chopin is evident in his piano music; in his orchestral works, his training under Rimsky-Korsakov, and his close association with The